Gibson J 160e Price

gibson j 160e price

In 1954 Gibson J 160e Price introduced a flat top jumbo acoustic – electric guitar and called it the gibson j-160e , the guitar gained popularity in 1962 when George Harrison & John Lennon from the beatles made it their standard acoustic guitar until 1968.Although the gibson j-160e was made famous by the beatles it does not have that distinguished full tone sound of a jumbo guitar , they had laminated tops and ladder bracings to cut feedback hence giving it less sustain and a flatter acoustic tone .

the newer models of  Gibson J 160e Price today (Gibson J 160e Price  ) are considered superior in sound because of their solid top, back and sides which gives the guitar more sustain and an overall bigger and brighter tone compared to their vintage cousins.vintage gibson j-160The vintage j-160e guitars paved the way for their new models of today which are very competitive to the martin d-28 and in my opinion sounds brighter & better Gibson J 160e Price.Despite its poor quality tone the vintage j-160e’s are still collectible and sought after due to their history . Was also the first gibson flat top with an adjustable bridge .

In Gibson J 160e Price had a 16″ wide body , was round shouldered , adjustable bridge , trapezoid inlays on rosewood fingerboard , solid spruce top , had a mahogany back and laminated mahogany sides , ladder bracing , adjustable pole pickups , had 19 frets, teardrop pre war style pickguards , crown peghead inlays and were made in sunburst finishes .In 1955 Gibson J 160e Price started making j-160e guitars with laminated spruce tops and 20 frets Small changes were made throughout the 60s until 1969 when the j-160e was a square shouldered dreadnought guitar and had non adjustable saddles .

In 1972 the j-160e was fitted with a three point pickguard and featured small block inlays . The guitar was discontinued in 1979 .In 1991 gibson reintroduced the Gibson J 160e Price with a solid spruce top and mahogany back/sides , a p-100 stacked coil humbucking pickup , upper belly on the bridge with no adjustable saddles , were made in vintage sunburst colors and were discontinued in 1997 .On Friday, Barone will be working with The Mendition of the Quay, which features Mike Jackman of Rindge on drums.

Gibson John Lennon Acoustic

gibson john lennon acoustic

On October 9, 2010, John Lennon would have been 70 years old. To celebrate the occasion, Gibson partnered with Yoko Ono to release three new acoustic guitars. Made by the luthiers at Gibson’s Montana acoustic guitar facility, the Lennon guitars represent three periods of the musicians life and career.

The first guitar is a Vintage Sunburst that Lennon used in 1963 and 1964 to record “Please Please Me,” “With The Beatles” and “A Hard Day’s Night.” Lennon couldn’t afford to buy the original guitar and had to get a loan from Beatles manager Brian Epstein. I’m glad he did.

The John Lennon J-160VS includes a 70th Anniversary John Lennon MOP signature on the headstock, a 1960′s laminated Sitka Spruce Top, mahogany back and sides, the classic vintage Sunburst lacquer finish, Jumbo 1960′s Frets, Gibson P-90 pickups, an historic adjustable bridge and a 70th Anniversary MOP engraved 12th Fret birthdate of John Lennon. Gibson is making 500 of these guitars and it will sell for $4,728.

The John Lennon “Imagine” guitar was requested by Yoko “to reflect the sentiment of John’s life and music during the recording of Imagine.” This white model includes an anniversary John Lennon Abalone headstock signature, 70th Anniversary MOP engraved 12th fret birthdate of Lennon, 1960s laminated Sitka Spruce top, historic Gibson Ladder bracing pattern, Mahogany back and sides, Jumbo 1960′s Frets, historic adjustable bridge, Gibson authentic P-90 pickups and a custom hardshell case.

The third model has a natural finish and has Lennon’s famous “John and Yoko” caricature sketches, representing the appearance of the guitar during the famous Lennon-Ono “Bed-In” peace protests of 1969. The original model is on display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland.

The Gibson Acoustic Lennon Museum J-160E model includes a Gibson Custom Shop Label Personally Signed by Yoko Ono, Authentic Recreation of John Lennon’s Bed‐In Caricature Sketch, 70th Anniversary John Lennon MOP Headstock Signature, 70th Anniversary MOP Engraved 12th Fret Birth Date of John Lennon, Label Personally Signed by Yoko Ono, 1960’s Laminated Sitka Spruce Top, Historic Gibson Ladder bracing Pattern, Mahogany Back & Sides, Custom Thin Lacquer Finish, Jumbo 1960’s Frets, Historic Adjustable Bridge, Gibson Authentic P‐90 Pickup and a Gibson Custom Shop Hardshell case.

The Imagine and Museum guitars are limited to 70 guitars each — one for each year since Lennon’s birth. The Imagine guitar will sell for $10,748 and the Museum guitar will sell for $15,048.

J160e Gibson

j160e gibson

The J-29 has amazing headroom. It’s a fantastically loud guitar if you want it to be—you can positively hammer the thing with a flatpick without generating confused harmonics. You get projection and raw horsepower that rivals any dread. The trade-off for all this volume—one many players will like—is brash, bright upper mids, which can get white-hot at times. These qualities remain pronounced through the otherwise agreeable and transparent L.R Baggs Element electronics. If you’re a rock strummer, you’ll probably love the J-29’s power and presence in a band mix. Meanwhile, that dynamic sensitivity means that you don’t have to strum too vigorously to get it. That said, it can be hard to back the J-29 down into those softer, smokier moods at which the mahogany J-45 excels.

Our J-29 was set up with slightly higher action than the J-15, presumably to highlight the guitar’s ample horsepower and definition when flatpicked. While the J-29 can excel at fingerstyle—especially high-harmonic detail in open tunings—it has a fast, excitable reactivity most at home in rock, bluegrass, and country.

The custom shop’s second and third renditions are limited to 70 guitars each, one for every year since John’s birth in 1940, and both include a special 70th Anniversary Certificate personally signed by Yoko Ono and sent to the final purchaser by Certified Mail. As for construction, each version is an accurate rendition of the J-160E of 1962, a guitar originally released in 1954 as one of the world’s first successful “electro-acoustic” guitars, with built-in pickup and electronics and ready to hit the stage for the professional performing musician. Beloved by Lennon, and kept close throughout his too-short life, the 70th Anniversary John Lennon J-160E is a guitar every Beatles fan will want to make their own.

I have bought a few other higher end Gibsons all with problems as well. This J160E had Scratches and imperfections in the finish. The bridge and nut height was way too high. The nut was cut with the high E too far out to edge so the string would slide off when used. The pick-up wiring was too long and picked up interference and was not grounded properly either. After I buffed out the finish, lowered the bridge by shaving the bottom of it off .002 inch, built a new nice BONE nut and leveled and crowned the frets and fixed the grounding problem, this is one fine guitar.

This means that the wood material was good and that it was assembled well. But the quality of the employees workmanship on the finishing line was sad to say the least and bad overall, this was not a scratch and dent either. Gibson should pay me back for the work I had to put into it to bring it’s finished quality in line. Gibson Just isn’t what they use to be.

 

J-160e Gibson Sale

j-160e

The Gibson J-160E acoustic-electric guitar, first released in 1954, was made famous by artists such as The Beatles. The guitar’s brassy, high-output acoustic-electric sound combined with punchy, warm acoustic tone re-creates the sound that led a musical revolution in the ’60s. The Gibson J-160E features a solid Sitka spruce top, solid mahogany back and sides, trapezoid fingerboard inlays, single-coil magnetic pickup at the neck, and volume and tone controls. Includes Gibson hardshell case

So where does Martin fit into all of this john lennon gibson j160e, given they’re the granddaddy of American acoustic guitar builders? Four years after the J-160E hit the stores, Martin introduced their first acoustic/ electric flattop guitars with the D-18E and D-28E—electrified versions of the D-18 and D-28, respectively. Both variations featured two large DeArmond pickups and four knobs (one Volume and one Tone for each pickup) mounted on the soundboard. The construction of these guitars required ladder bracing similar to the J-160E, and the overall sound quality suffered because of it. Those who have seen these electric Martins know they were clunky, and large parts of the soundboard were removed for the pickups. Production of the D-18E lasted only two years and the D-28E was produced through 1964. There is little collector value with Martin’s first acoustic/ electrics—roughly half of the acoustic versions.

The J-160E will never replace any high-quality flattop acoustic in terms of sound, but as one of the first guitars to allow a player to use it acoustically and electrically, it succeeds wonderfully. Any guitar associated with the Beatles is a treasure in my book ,If you’re interested in exploring this subject further, check out Gibson’s Fabulous Flat-Top Guitars by Eldon Whitford, David Vinopal, and Dan Erlewine.

First released in 1954, the Gibson J-160E Standard Acoustic-Electric Guitar was made famous by artists such as The Beatles. The J-160E guitar’s brassy, high-output acoustic-electric sound combined with punchy, warm acoustic tone accurately re-creates the sound that led a musical revolution in the ’60s. The Gibson J-160E guitar is equipped with a solid Sitka spruce top, solid mahogany back and sides, trapezoid fingerboard inlays, standard P90 pickup at the neck, and controls for volume and tone. Gibson includes a hardshell case with the acoustic-electric J-160E.I bought my J160E about 3 years ago.

Gibson J160 E

 

gibson j 160 e

While the J-160E was certainly a dual-purpose instrument, many collectors don’t realize that it was designed primarily as an electric that could be used as an acoustic. Piezo and internal pickups were years from being developed, so this is all Gibson knew at the time. The laminated top and ladder bracing were used intentionally to prevent unwanted frequencies and feedback. Also, because the neck was moved up to allow room for the pickup, the bridge had to be moved forward as well—so traditional X bracing wouldn’t work in this situation.

According to the serial number, your guitar dates from either 1966 or 1969. The long-style pickguard on your guitar was introduced in 1968, so we can safely assume your guitar is a 1969 model. This was probably one of the last J-160Es produced before Gibson switched to the square shoulder body style they adopted on nearly all their acoustics in the late ’60s and early ’70s. For whatever reason, the J-160E was always a bit late to adopt changes compared to other Gibson models. Everything appears to be stock on the guitar, including the bridge and control knobs.

This 1969 J-160E, in the condition it appears (which is 70 percent or “average”), is valued today between $1850 and $2250. If it were mint, it would be a $3000 to $3500 instrument. Astute readers will know that the J-160E is more valuable than an SJ produced during the same period. The J-160E ’s value is higher simply because of its association with the Beatles, and this is fairly typical of any guitar that a famous musician or band is known for using. Instrument association has affected every instrument the Beatles ever played, including Paul McCartney’s Höfner 500/1 “Beatle Bass,” John Lennon’s Rickenbacker 325 and Gibson J-160E, and George Harrison’s Rickenbacker 360 12-string.

 

 

 

Gibson 160E

gibson 160e

 

The Gibson J-160E is one of the first acoustic-electric guitars produced by the Gibson Guitar Corporation.

The gibson 160e guitar was Gibson’s second attempt at creating an acoustic-electric guitar (the first being the small-body CF-100E). The basic concept behind the guitar was to fit a single-pickup (and associated electronics) into a normal-size dreadnought acoustic guitar.

The J-160E used plywood for most of the guitar’s body, and was ladder-braced, whereas other acoustic Gibsons were X-braced. The rosewood fingerboard had trapezoid inlays, and the guitar had an adjustable bridge. For amplification, a single-coil pickup (an uncovered P-90 pickup) was installed under the top of the body with the pole screws protruding through the top at the end of the fingerboard, with a volume and a tone knob.

John Lennon and George Harrison frequently used one with The Beatles, both on-stage and in the studio. Gibson produces a standard J-160E and a John Lennon J-160E Peace model, based on the J-160E he used during the Bed-In days of 1969. Epiphone makes an EJ-160E John Lennon replica signature model.

Barry Gibb of the Bee Gees plays a J-160E, and can be seen in several live performances of the band from 1967 to 1968.Sam Lightnin’ Hopkins played a J-160E which is on display at the Rock Hall of Fame.Richard Barone plays a J-160E as his primary acoustic guitar on solo and band performances and with The Bongos.

Pete Doherty of the Libertines/babyshambles plays a J-160E during most of his solo appearances.Chad Stuart and Jeremy Clyde of Chad and Jeremy played J-160E guitars from 1964 to 1968.Peter Asher and Gordon Waller of Peter and Gordon played J-160E guitars, and can be seen in live acts in US during the 2000s.Steve Marriott of Small Faces used a J-160E as the main acoustic guitar for the 1967 album Small Faces.Mike Viola of Mike Viola and The Candy Butchers uses a J-160e with a Fishman blend Pickup.Elvis Costello uses a J-160e.

He moved the pickup from the neck to the bottom of the sound hole, then in ’67 commissioned Dutch artists Simon and Marijke Posthuma, a.k.a. The Fool, to give it a psychedelic paint job, to commemorate the “All You Need Is Love” satellite broadcast. It’s seen in rehearsal shots of that event, but at air time he opted to just sing.

Lennon later had it professionally stripped, replaced the pickguard and put the pickup back where it was originally. This guitar was last seen in action during the Bed-Ins, where Lennon scratched two caricatures of himself and Yoko on the front. Recently on display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Cleveland, on loan from the Lennon Estate.

John Lennon Gibson

john lennon gibson

1962 John Lennon Gibson acoustic/electric, sunburst finish. Lennon and Harrison each bought one of these “jumbo” models (price: £161) in Rushworth’s Music House in Liverpool on 10 September 1962 (shown at right with guitar/amp department manager Bob Hobbs). Mersey Beat, in the caption from its photo commemorating the event, noted the guitars were “the only ones of their type in the country — which were specially flown to England by jet from America.”

This was probably hyperbole, as they’d taken two months to arrive after being special-ordered. (Additionally, these photos may have been taken a few days after the sale, for they already sport straps and smudges.) These john lennon gibson guitar Gibsons were used on the 11 September recordings of “Love Me Do,” but those tracks sound nearly identical to the earlier takes of those songs, which tends to confirm an earlier purchase date. Lennon’s J-160 E was used through the Please, Please Me sessions, then stolen during the ’63 Christmas show at the Finsbury Park Astoria Theatre, London. (Pity poor Malcolm Evans, who had to break the news to Lennon.) By this time, however, Lennon and Harrison had gotten their identical guitars mixed up, so it was the one registered to Harrison that disappeared.

The J-160E will never replace any high-quality flattop acoustic in terms of sound, but as one of the first John Lennon Gibson guitars to allow a player to use it acoustically and electrically, it succeeds wonderfully. Any guitar associated with the Beatles is a treasure in my book!

If you’re interested in exploring this subject further, check out Gibson’s Fabulous Flat-Top John Lennon Gibson Guitars by Eldon Whitford, David Vinopal, and Dan Erlewine. Lennon bought this to replace the above guitar, even though he often used Harrison’s for recording. It was first used in concert in Montreal on 8 September 1964 and served as a backup for the ’65 world tours. Except for an extra rosette around the sound hole — and a visible orange label inside — it was identical to his first J-160E, but it wouldn’t stay that way for long.

Gibson J160

Gibson J 160

I have a Gibson J-160E from the ’60s that has seen quite a bit of playing over the years. The serial number is 8419XX, but it doesn’t have the “Made in USA” stamp. Contrary to what many players say, I think this guitar sounds great as an acoustic. Can you give me a little history on the J-160E and what its value is today? Also, I find it surprising that the J-160E is so popular, yet I don’t hear much about early Martin acoustic electrics. Thanks!

Lennon bought this john lennon gibson j160e to replace the above guitar, even though he often used Harrison’s for recording. It was first used in concert in Montreal on 8 September 1964 and served as a backup for the ’65 world tours. Except for an extra rosette around the sound hole — and a visible orange label inside — it was identical to his first J-160E, but it wouldn’t stay that way for long. He moved the pickup from the neck to the bottom of the sound hole, then in ’67 commissioned Dutch artists Simon and Marijke Posthuma, a.k.a. The Fool, to give it a psychedelic paint job, to commemorate the “All You Need Is Love” satellite broadcast. It’s seen in rehearsal shots of that event, but at air time he opted to just sing. Lennon later had it professionally stripped, replaced the pickguard and put the pickup back where it was originally. This guitar was last seen in action during the Bed-Ins, where Lennon scratched two caricatures of himself and Yoko on the front. Recently on display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Cleveland, on l

Electrified guitars were the norm by the early ’50s, but a true flattop acoustic guitar with a pickup had yet to be produced. Gibson introduced the CF-100E in 1951, which was an electrified version of the CF-100, introduced shortly before. The CF-100E featured one single-coil pickup mounted at the bottom of the fretboard—a far cry in design from the acoustic/electric guitars of today. Both models had a small body and sharp Florentine cutaway, but were discontinued in 1958, as they were not very popular.

In 1954, Gibson launched an electrified version of their hugely popular Southern Jumbo (SJ) called the J-160E. Like the CF-100E, it had a single-coil pickup mounted right below the fretboard with electric-style Volume and Tone knobs mounted directly on the soundboard. The J-160E featured a 3-ply laminated spruce top (the earliest models in 1954 were solid), a solid mahogany back, laminated mahogany sides, and a neck that met the body at the 15th fret, allowing room for the pickup between the fretboard and soundhole.

Gibson J 160

Gibson J 160

Seventy years after his birth and three decades after his untimely passing, John Lennon’s message of peace continues to touch the masses, and his songs still resonate in the hearts and minds of fans around the world. At the request of Yoko Ono, Gibson Guitar is proud to offer three 70th Anniversary Gibson J 160 acoustic guitars to celebrate the legacy of this extraordinary artist. Accordingly, only a very limited number of these handmade acoustics will ever be available.

In 1962, John Lennon was still an up-and-coming artist, and though one of two main singer/songwriters at the heart of The Beatles, was scraping by on the little money the band was bringing in at that time. For his first quality American acoustic/electric guitar, Lennon had his sights set on a new Gibson J-160E – the problem was, he didn’t have the money to buy it. With the aid of a co-signed purchase from Beatles manager Brian Epstein (who also co-signed for bandmate George Harrison’s J-160E), Lennon made the guitar his own, and put it straight to the business of making rock and roll history. Recreated by the luthiers at

Gibson’s Montana acoustic guitar facility in period-perfect detail, the 70th Anniversary John Lennon models are available in three distinct versions to represent the instrument at three periods in Lennon’s life and career. The first, finished in Vintage Sunburst and limited to 500 guitars, represents the guitar as it was when Lennon first acquired it and used it on several famous Beatles recordings from 1963 to ’64, including Please Please Me, With The Beatles and A Hard Day’s Night.

The second is a stunning Custom Shop “Imagine” model in a Soft White finish personally requested by Yoko Ono to reflect the sentiment of John’s life and music during the recording of Imagine. And the third is the model as it is today, on display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, with a thin, natural finish and Lennon’s famous “John and Yoko” caricature sketches, representing the appearance of the guitar during the famous Lennon-Ono “Bed-In” peace protests of 1969.

Gibson John Lennon

gibson john lennon

In 1954, Gibson John Lennon launched an electrified version of their hugely popular Southern Jumbo (SJ) called the J-160E. Like the CF-100E, it had a single-coil pickup mounted right below the fretboard with electric-style Volume and Tone knobs mounted directly on the soundboard. The J-160E featured a 3-ply laminated spruce top (the earliest models in 1954 were solid), a solid mahogany back, laminated mahogany sides, and a neck that met the body at the 15th fret, allowing room for the pickup between the fretboard and soundhole.

While the J-160E was certainly a dual-purpose instrument, many collectors don’t realize that it was designed primarily as an electric that could be used as an acoustic. Piezo and internal pickups were years from being developed, so this is all Gibson knew at the time. The laminated top and ladder bracing were used intentionally to prevent unwanted frequencies and feedback. Also, because the neck was moved up to allow room for the pickup, the bridge had to be moved forward as well—so traditional X bracing wouldn’t work in this situation.

According to the serial number, your guitar dates from either 1966 or 1969. The long-style pickguard on your guitar was introduced in 1968, so we can safely assume your guitar is a 1969 model. This was probably one of the last J-160Es produced before Gibson switched to the square shoulder body style they adopted on nearly all their acoustics in the late ’60s and early ’70s. For whatever reason, the J-160E was always a bit late to adopt changes compared to other Gibson models. Everything appears to be stock on the guitar, including the bridge and control knobs.

This 1969 J-160E, in the condition it appears (which is 70 percent or “average”), is valued today between $1850 and $2250. If it were mint, it would be a $3000 to $3500 instrument. Astute readers will know that the J-160E is more valuable than an SJ produced during the same period. The J-160E ’s value is higher simply because of its association with the Beatles, and this is fairly typical of any guitar that a famous musician or band is known for using. Instrument association has affected every instrument the Beatles ever played, including Paul McCartney’s Höfner 500/1 “Beatle Bass,” John Lennon’s Rickenbacker 325 and Gibson J-160E, and George Harrison’s Rickenbacker 360 12-string.