Bob Dylan Guitar Style

bob dylan guitar style

After years of design and development overseen by the artist’s personal guidance, The Bob Dylan Autographed SJ-200 Collector’s Edition is an exact replica of Bob’s personal highly-customized Bob Dylan Guitar Style guitar. Fashioned from highly figured Indian rosewood and AAA Sitka spruce. The headstock features the artist’s eye logo inlaid in mother-of-pearl with a Bella Voce mother-of-pearl inlay in the fret board. The double pick guards are ornately decorated with an inlay of abalone.

Each model features a label autographed by Bob Dylan and is numbered in the series on the head block. Only 175 guitars will be made and distributed for worldwide sales. These guitars will also include a unique limited edition hard-shell case with embroidered artist’s eye logo. Reserve yours now at your authorized Gibson Montana dealer.

The guitar and lyrics were left aboard a private airplane used by Bob Dylan and his band and crew in the months after the 1965 Newport performance. The plane was flown by a commercial pilot based in New Jersey, Vic Quinto, who had been engaged by Albert Grossman to shuttle artists Mr. Grossman managed, including Bob Dylan and Peter, Paul, and Mary. In 2011 Mr. Quinto’s daughter, Dawn Peterson, submitted the items to the PBS television program History Detectives for authentication. The guitar and lyrics have been proven to be genuine and are now being offered for sale at Christie’s, and will be on view at Christie’s Rockefeller Center location in advance of the auction.

It has been referred to as “the most written-about performance in the history of rock & roll,” as it announced a seismic shift in the direction of popular music in the 1960s and beyond. Bob Dylan’s 1965 performance at Newport – his first with an electric backing band, with Dylan playing this guitar – has been cited by Rolling Stone magazine as one of the most notable events in music history.

In a blistering three-song electric set, Dylan, only 24 years old at the time and already recognized as the most important songwriter of his generation, forever established himself as one of the most important figures in rock & roll. The performance was unexpected, loud, and powerful, and the reaction it caused became a moment of legend, elevating Dylan’s persona beyond that of an acoustic folk singer. The audience at Newport revolted: “I did this very crazy thing,” Dylan said at the time. “I didn’t know what was going to happen, but they certainly booed, I’ll tell you that. You could hear it all over the place.”